Supplement recommendations to boost your immune system

Did you ever wonder what supplements you should be taking during this COVID-19 virus? I’ve had a lot of questions recently about what supplements to take to not only prevent illness, but also fight off illness and boost your immunity. Although there are no vaccines to date for COVID-19, there is a ton of emerging research on different nutraceuticals and botanicals that can be used once again to not only prevent illness, but to fight off illness. Let’s dive in.

  1. Curcumin

Curcumin. This has been shown to reduce inflammation, as well as reduce the viral infection of COVID-19. It is beneficial to have black pepper with it, which enhances the bioavailability. The recommendation is 500 to 1000 milligrams twice a day.

2. Quercetin

This is a plant flavanoid that is found in many fruits and vegetables and it has been shown to decrease viral growth. It is recommended to take 1000 milligrams twice a day orally.

3. Zinc

Through a large body of research, zinc has been shown to have antiviral properties. You would take this in any form of zinc, so it could be citrate, acetate, glycinate, picolinate, or gluconate. You would take small doses of 30 to 60 milligrams throughout the day.

4. Vitamin D

This has been shown to reduce upper respiratory infections, decrease viral growth, as well as improve the overall immune system. This recommended dosage is 5000 international units daily.

5. Vitamin C

This can really play a huge role in immune defense and it is actually being used in the hospitals treating COVID-19. Take one to three grams a day orally.

6. Vitamin A

Not only does it support the lining of the respiratory tract, but it also can contribute to reducing inflammation and supporting the immune system. You would take 10,000 to 25,000 international units daily.

7. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC)

This can support the production of glutathione, which is one of our most powerful antioxidants. In addition to that, it also can reduce the severity of the flu. It is recommended to  take 600-900 mg twice a day.

8. Melatonin

We know that during times of stress we are not getting the proper amount of sleep, or the proper quality of sleep. Melatonin can help produce more restful sleep and can also reduce inflammation. You can take five to 20 milligrams before bedtime.

9. Elderberry

This has been used extensively in the prevention of the flu. In addition to that, it’s packed with vitamin C, antioxidants, and fiber. You can take 500 milligrams orally.

10. Resveratrol

This is a compound found in red grapes, and it has been shown in the lab to attack a relative virus of COVID-19. Resveratrol’s anti-inflammatory properties appear to play a significant role in accelerating the healing of organs such as the liver, lungs, intestines and heart by slowing inflammation and swelling. It is recommended to take 100-150 milligrams twice a day.

11. Green tea or EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate)

This has been shown to reduce information and has also been known to affect the pathway that is consistent with the COVID-19 virus. You can either drink four cups of green tea daily or take 200 milligrams of the EGCG.

Summary

Of course we know what all the precautions associated with COVID-19 are wearing masks, washing your hands, and participating in social distancing. However, you can also consider how you can optimize your immune system. If you do get this virus, you can potentially decrease the viral load thereby changing the way that your body responds to it. Whether it is coming from foods, (check out 12 immune- boosting foods,) or supplementation, this is a really good opportunity to do whatever you can to stay as healthy as possible. Of course, please don’t forget sleep hygeine, meditation, and movement!

If you’d like a ready to order list with high grade supplements (that you can customize), email drarianne@themovementparadigm.com with “supplements” in the subject line.

If you need help on your journey to better health, contact drarianne@themovementparadigm.com to schedule.

For more content, make sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel here.

Source: Institute of Functional Medicine

Disclaimer: This is not intended to treat or diagnose. Please check with your physican or functional medicine practitioner to determine a specific plan.

What is stress doing to your weight loss goals? I Hormones

Did you know that stress can significantly affect your ability to lose weight? I wish weight loss was as simple as “eat less and exercise more.” However, many of you have probably experienced weight loss resistance despite doing all of the things that you should be doing from a nutritional, stress management, and movement standpoint. Now, don’t get me wrong, there are always ways to continue to improve your health. But why do some of us struggle to lose those extra stubborn pounds?

There are multiple reasons why this could happen, some of which include changes in the microbiome,  leaky gut, which can affect your ability to absorb nutrients, inflammation which can result from food, toxins, bugs, trauma, and hormone dysregulation. That is what we’re going to focus on today. Here are four hormones that can be interfering with your weight loss.

  1. Insulin

As it relates to hormones, the number one offender is going to be insulin, no doubt about it. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas. It signals to your body to absorb glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream and turn it into fat. It is referred to as the “fat storing hormone, because it can shut down the metabolic burning. This is why high blood sugar and high insulin levels make it harder to lose weight. Therefore, it can contribute to chronic disease, excess weight gain, and excess fat storage. Increased caloric intake, stress, weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), genetics, hypertension, Polycysytic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) among others can contribute to insulin resistance.

2. Thyroid

One in five women and one in 10 men have been diagnosed with thyroid disease. However, about 50 percent of the cases go undiagnosed primarily because the testing is insufficient for really looking at a complete picture of the thyroid. Most often, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is checked. However, there is also a free T3, free T4, Thyrogobulin Aibodies (TgAb), Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies(TPOAb), and sometimes reverse T3 to really get an entire picture. Some of the things that can contribute to thyroid disease are gluten intolerance, stress, and environmental toxins, which are huge contributors including any type of nutrient deficiency.

3. Cortisol

This is one of our biggest stress hormones. When we are under stress or we have a perceived threat or stressor, we activate the Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis (HPA axis). This is our stress pathway in our body. Our amygdala in our limbic system detects this perceived threat. A physiological response is mediated through the hypothalamus triggering the pituitary gland by secreting corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). The pituitary gland in our brain secretes adrenal corticotropic hormone (ACTH) into the bloodstream to signal the adrenal glands, which sit right on top of the kidneys. The adrenal glands then in turn release glucocorticoids, such as cortisol. When this happens in the case of running from a tiger that is a normal response, it’s a survival mechanism. The problem starts when we have this stress response all the time. This is when it can lead to things like weight gain, insulin resistance, loss of lean body mass, increased fat storage, and the higher propensity for any kind of inflammatory condition, autoimmune disease, or chronic conditions. Therefore, it’s really important to understand how this stress pathway, when under chronic stress, affects your ability to lose weight or not. Keep this in mind that it could be a ding on a phone or it could be running from a tiger, if you’re having the same response all the time, then that pathway is constantly activated, which means cortisol is constantly being released.

4. Sex Hormones

Many women can experience things like breast tenderness, heavy menstrual bleeding, fibroids, weight gain, fluid gain, and bloating. This can all be largely in part due to a high sugar diet and a highly refined carbohydrate diet, as well as environmental toxins and stress of course, contributing to increased estrogen dominance in the body. Now men on the other hand can also experience this and they might notice things like increased breast tissue and abdominal weight gain. This also can factor into if men have low testosterone. In this case they might have sexual dysfunction, poor libido, brain fog, inability to concentrate, bone loss, and weight gain.

There are many ways to naturally balance hormones that apply to all of the above. First and most importantly is decreasing stress!  As you can see, this is one of the consistent hormone disruptors in weight loss. Finding ways to manage your stress through meditation, journaling, nature, walking, talking with friends, or simply whatever helps you the most. Other very important things to consider include:

  1. Balance your blood sugars
  2. Include a protein, healthy fat, and fiber source in each meal and snack.
  3. Eat a high-quality protein source at EVERY meal
  4. Eat every 4-6 hours (unless hungry)
  5. Consume healthy fats
  6. AVOID sugar and refined carbohydrates! This can’t be stressed enough.
  7. Limit or eliminate alcohol
  8. Avoid undereating or overeating
  9. Eat fatty fish (Salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel) as often as possible
  10. Get enough high-quality sleep

Summary

The take home message is this. I want you to understand that stress plays a huge role in your ability to lose weight, if that is your goal. It is really important to understand how mindset, mindfulness, stress reduction, and relaxation are all so vital to an overall health program. It is way more than just losing weight, it is about feeling healthy inside and outside. To do that you really need to focus on managing your stress. The ways that you can do that are through basic informal mindfulness practices, formal meditation, breath work, grounding with your feet, walking out in nature, etc. There are so many ways to just take time for you and take time to really manage your stress levels because, as you can see it directly impacts all of these aspects of your health and your immunity.

If you need help on your journey, please reach out!

For more content, make sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel here.

What do NSAID’s do to your gut?

Are you a person that takes Advil or Aleve for any common cold symptoms, aches or pains, or headaches that you experience? If you do, you are like most Americans. These are some of the most widely taken drugs in America. In fact, we have 16,000 deaths per year just from non-steroidal anti-inflammatories.

In case you’re wondering what falls into this category, here’s a list of common NSAIDs:

  • Advil / Motrin (ibuprofen)
  • Aspirin
  • Aleve (naproxen sodium)
  • Celebrex
  • Naprosyn (naproxen)
  • Lodine (etodolac)
  • Mobic
  • Nalfon (fenoprofen)
  • Daypro (oxaprozin)
  • Ansaid (flurbiprofen)
  • Cambia / Cataflam / Voltaren (diclofenac)
  • COX-2 Inhibitors

Impact of NSAIDs

Not only do we have 16,000 deaths a year, but we also have well recognized side effects that sometimes people ignore, damage to your gut lining. According to a study done by the National Institute of Health (NIH), all of the conventional NSAID’s were shown to affect small intestinal inflammation. This is one of the common findings with NSAID use, especially chronic NSAID use. It is affecting the integrity of the gut mucosa. This can contribute to a condition called leaky gut, or intestinal permeability. Please make sure that you check out my YouTube video on leaky gut here to understand more and how it can impact a whole host of conditions and symptoms that you may be experiencing.

Rather watch or listen than read? Click here

Leaky Gut

Leaky gut or intestinal permeability allows undigested food particles, viruses, and pathogens to enter the bloodstream, which in turn causes an immune reaction and inflammation in our body. This can again contribute to many different symptoms from headaches to digestive issues to chronic pain, and so on. In addition to damaging the gut lining, it can also exacerbate symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease, and can contribute to colitis which can resemble inflammatory bowel disease. Older individuals are at higher risk, but it can affect anyone.

But, is Tylenol okay?

Although current guidelines suggest taking no more than 4,000 milligrams of acetaminophen daily, a study published in 2006 by the American Medical Association, stated that this dose for four or more days frequently causes elevated ALT, a liver enzyme and marker for injury. This continued even after it was discontinued.

There is a 3.7 times increased risk of bleeding in the upper GI tract with chronic consumption of acetaminophen of doses greater than 2000 milligrams. Overdose of this can also continue to leaky gut. Lastly, it can deplete one of your master antioxidants, glutathione.

Summary

Figure out why you’re having pain, headaches, or any other symptoms. I would recommend seeking out a rehabilitation professional, functional medicine practitioner, or dietitian to determine why you’re having headaches, chronic pain, or chronic sickness. This will help you address the root of the problem, the chronic injury cycle, and the chronic medical cycle that you’re going through, so that you don’t need to mask it with something that is negatively impacting your gut health, i.e. your immune health. Remember, 70 to 80 percent of our immune system is in your gut, so every time you take an NSAID, you can be impacting your immune system and your ability to regulate your mood and emotions. Ninety percent of our serotonin, “our feel-good neurotransmitter” is in our gut.

So, next time you want to take an NSAID think about all this information and how it could make your health worse, not better. You might feel better in that moment, but overtime it can take a huge toll on your body. There are many other options to getting yourself back to a pain-free, healthy life.

Are you ready to feel great again? Reach out to schedule an evaluation.

For more content, make sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel here.

Challenge Accepted | Dr. Arianne Missimer | TEDxWilmingtonWomen

2 months before her wedding Arianne was diagnosed with cancer – and accepted the challenge of returning to health – and helping others. Through mindset, nutrition, and movement we can overcome our challenges. Arianne shares her secrets to success as a physical therapist, cancer survivor, and American Ninja Warrior competitor to help you overcome the challenges you’re facing right now.

Continue reading “Challenge Accepted | Dr. Arianne Missimer | TEDxWilmingtonWomen”

Delawarean beat cancer and took on ‘American Ninja Warrior’

Source: delawareonline.com

It began with a simple urging from her future husband.

Arianne Missimer had played basketball at St. Mark’s High, studied dietetics and fitness at the University of Delaware and earned a doctorate in physical therapy at Neumann University.

Along the way, she’d become an expert in physical conditioning, adept at helping others reach optimum levels of fitness through various forms of movement. She was 22 when she opened her own fitness center.

Continue reading “Delawarean beat cancer and took on ‘American Ninja Warrior’”